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07 Forenza radiator leaking oil, no reason
12-20-2014, 03:22 PM
Post: #1
07 Forenza radiator leaking oil, no reason
hi,
I got in an accident and had to replace my radiator before I replaced the radiator it was only leaking coolant obviously since the radiator is broken after replacing the radiator it started to leak oil I can't seem to find out why I've tried plugging one hole and blowing through the next it doesn't seem to be a leakdoes anyone have any suggestions thank you. Also i did buy the radiator at a pull a part junkyard but it seemed to be in excellent shape.
I'm also not really sure why transmission fluid goes through the radiator would it be possible to just took one hose up to the next and bypass the radiator all together?

Thanks so much.
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12-20-2014, 04:25 PM
Post: #2
RE: 07 Forenza radiator leaking oil, no reason
Under no reason DO NOT I REPEAT DO NOT BYPASS THE RADIATOR. Some manufactures use the radiator to help cool down the transmission fluids. If you bypass the radiator you could ultimately burn up your transmission causing thousands in rebuilt trainy repairs.
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12-20-2014, 04:48 PM
Post: #3
RE: 07 Forenza radiator leaking oil, no reason
Sounds like you have opened a new can of worms with the replacement radiator so let's step back a moment and review things...

If the radiator has a set of small pipes going to it they are most likely for the transmission cooler, which means the new leak is probably ATF, especially if it's got a red tint to it. The leak could be a clamp that's not tight enough or in the case of threaded fittings, they are not tight.... OR... you have cross threaded one and it will never seal because the seat is cocked.

That said, you could run a piece of fuel line to bypass the cooler but in the long run the transmission will not cool properly and that will cause early failure of the trans.

What I would do is carefully look around at the wet area of the radiator to pin point that oil leak and double check your work to see if you stop the drip. Once you feel it's fixed then clean things up and check it again in a day or two.

Now, the reason they put that oil cooler in the radiator is two fold. The first is obvious... it helps keep the trans cool by dumping extra heat into the antifreeze. The second is since the engine warms up faster than the trany on a cold day it transfers heat to the trans to get it up to operating temp faster. Basically it's a win / win situation because cold weather makes for condensation and warming things up faster gets rid of the moisture. On top of that most of the new cars have an overdrive plus a lock up torque converter, which both come into play AFTER things warm up past a certain point. The whole idea here is to have the entire drivetrain warm up as a unit, which extends the life of all the parts. Since the on board computer monitors all of this there may be problems if the trany reads way different than the engine for a long period of time. IOW, you'd be better off if you didn't modify things.

Let us know how you make out or if you have further questions.
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